Wednesday, 24 November 2010

Let's Brew Wednesday - 1928 Barclay Perkins OMS

Part whatever in our series of Barclay Perkins beers from the 1920's. And, amazingly, actually appearing on a Wednesday. Who could ask for more?

You're going to get it, though. More, that is. Because this beer I can use like a pointy stick to poke you in the eye with. To make a didactic point. Everyone likes a poke now and then. Oatmeal Stout. I've seen my fair share of these beers. They were all the rage in the first half of the 20th century. And for the most part a big con. Why? Because they mostly contained bugger all oats. Little more than a token amount in many cases.

My first sighting of Barclay Perkins OMS was 1910. When it had a gravity of 1053º. And one of the 32 quarters in the grist was oats. Roughly 3%. By the 1920's, the oats content was down to just a few pounds. Surely not enough to have been noticeable.

More revealing is what went on at Whitbread. In 1912, they suddenly started throwing a few oats into their Porter/London Stout party-gyle. They'd obviously started marketing an Oatmeal Stout. But, not having a second small brewhouse like Barclay Perkins, they couldn't brew it as aa standalone beer. No problem - just add it to the party-gyle. Except it wasn't really a different beer. Just the London Stout under another name. Because or the party-gyle, it meant that the Porter was in reality an Oatneal Porter and all the London Stout was an Oatmeal Stout.

Not that it mattered. No-one was going to spot the fact. The quantity of oats was laughable. 1 quarter out of 402. What's that? About 0.25% of the grist. A total joke, really.

I've just been going through Fuller's WW I brewing records. In 1910 they started hoying the odd pound of oats into their Porter/Brown Stout party-gyle. Half a quarter in a grist of 75 quarters. A bit over 1% of the grist. I suspect they were up to the same as Whitbread. They'd started marketing an Oatmeal Stout and the simplest way to make one was to simply modify their Stout recipe to include a token quantity of oats. Presumably taking care not to add so much as to piss off the drinkers of their standard Stout.

There is one exception to this. One Oatmeal Stout that's worthy of the name: Maclay's 1909 OMS. That has 4.5 quarters of oats out of a total of just 16.5 quarters. That's a bit more like it. Enough oats to actually taste.

There you have it. Oatmeal Stout. A marketing concept rather than a real style. Where have I come across something like that before?




On that cheerful note, I'll pass you on to Kristen . . . . .





Barclay Perkins - 1928 - OMS
General info: OMS, OMG, Oatmeal stout! Finally, an oatmeal stout! Wait, where’s the oatmeal? Crammed in the very top of the grist ingredients, kinda penned in at the last minute. 16 pounds of oats for over 9000 gals of beer. Can't you just TASTE the oatmeal!? Oatmeal or not, this is a bloody great stout. Looks very much like an Imperial grist just lower in gravity. A baby RIS. yeah, I like that....
Beer Specifics

Recipe by percentages
Gravity (OG)
1.051

53.5% English 2 row
4.1% Flaked Maize
Gravity (FG)
1.014

8.5% Amber malt
0.1% Flaked Oats
ABV
4.93%

7.3% Roasted Barley

Apparent attenuation
72.55%

6.3% Crystal 75

Real attenuation
59.43%

4.7% Brown malt

IBU
48.6

Mash
90min@152°F
0.71qt/lb

SRM
117


90min@66.7°C
1.48L/kg

EBC
231.0










Boil
2.25 hours













Homebrew @ 70%
Craft @ 80%
Grist
5gal
19L
10bbl
10hl
English 2 row
5.47
lb
2.490
kg
296.65
lb
114.62
kg
Amber malt
0.87
lb
0.397
kg
47.27
lb
18.26
kg
Roasted Barley
0.75
lb
0.341
kg
40.65
lb
15.70
kg
Crystal 75
0.64
lb
0.292
kg
34.77
lb
13.43
kg
Brown malt
0.48
lb
0.219
kg
26.08
lb
10.08
kg
Flaked Maize
0.42
lb
0.192
kg
22.82
lb
8.82
kg
Flaked Oats
0.01
lb
0.004
kg
0.53
lb
0.21
kg
Invert No3
1.40
lb
0.638
kg
76.07
lb
29.39
kg
Caramel Colorant
0.18
lb
0.080
kg
9.51
lb
3.67
kg

8.631

3.930

554.35124












Hops








Cluster 7% 120min
0.28
oz
8.0
g
17.46
oz
0.422
kg
Fuggle 5.5% 90min
1.78
oz
50.4
g
110.29
oz
2.665
kg









Fermentation
63°F /17.2°C















Yeast
Nottingham ale

1968 London ESB Ale Yeast  - WLP002 English Ale Yeast









Tasting Notes:
Holy darkness. This sucker is nearly black but has these beautiful ruby highlights running through her. Tons of toasted malt, bread crusts. Very strong espresso and mocha. Hints of dark caramel with a chewy resinous hop twang. Treacle and tree sap. Plummy fruit and brandied cherries. So complex, so smooth. Perfect pint to go with a nice fruit cake. Something you can fall into and give you another hour or so of fuel to be able to deal with the holiday season.

9 comments:

Oblivious said...

Looks like a lovely stout one to keep in mind

But they should have really called it a "Homeopathic Oatmeal Stout"!!!

Gary Gillman said...

This sounds like a very good stout.

It makes we wonder why some of the early writers bemoaned the adoption of a pale malt base for porter. Maybe the lure of the old was followed uncritically. I think Kristen has stated that he has made all-brown malt porters and these were not radically different or better than ones with pale malt.

According to this expert technical writer, the oats were used to assist mash filtration, both in English brewing and Irish whiskey manufacture (and of course that explains the small quantities):

http://books.google.com/books?id=9P3lGgNahvgC&pg=PA15&dq=irish+whiskey+%2B+small+amounts+of+oats+%2B+filtration&hl=en&ei=YgDtTO-cJJjgnQeGmbyaAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnu

Barm said...

Genuine Scotch Oatmeal Stout, eh? I guess that means ((Scotch Oatmeal) Stout), i.e. the oatmeal they used came from Scotland, a bit like how Carling today claims to be made from 100% British barley … which means that all the barley used in it is British, not that the beer is all-malt.

Craig said...

I'd love to see the breakdown of the Maclay's 1909! I want to do an OMS that the three bears would be proud of!

Ron Pattinson said...

Craig, you can see the brewing log here:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2009/11/1909-maclays-63-oms.html

Oblivious said...

"the oats were used to assist mash filtration"


Garry Oats are glutinous are not great of mash run off, but oat husks are great aid for improving run off and prevent a stuck sparge

America tend to use rice hulls instead

Kristen England said...

The drivel about 'mash filtering' is just that. I'm sure if you put enough oat malt into something you'll get the added husk for help but then you also add all the beta-glucan which makes lautering a PITA. However, less than 1% of the mash and not entirely husky material I don't understand it.

As for the Maclays its very good if you use the 'right' oatmeal. I've found the crappy flaked oats leave a mealy feeling and flavor. If you use the really nice Scottish Pinhead oats or the Irish ones for that matter its much more complex and flavorful.

Gary Gillman said...

There is no question that oat malt, or oat chaff (hulls), was used to assist in mash filtering: the brewing chemist and beer historian Ian Hornsey also confirms it:

http://books.google.com/books?id=QqnvNsgas20C&pg=PA15&dq=oats+%2B+filtering+the+mash&hl=en&ei=g2_tTNrpHoOTnQfi27COAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CCgQ6AEw

As for flaked oats, perhaps not since this processed form is de-hulled I believe.

I assume the original BP recipe called for flaked oats, not malted oats. In that case, one might assume it was added for flavour only, but the situation for malted oats is different or at least has a dual function per these scientific authorities.

Gary

Lady Luck Brewing said...

I know this is an older post but that amount of oats should be measured in flakes along with the grams.
LOL