Friday, 4 September 2015

Berlin day five

The day begins with another pesky wasp. Why do I attract the bloody things?

Quite a bit of flapping accompanies my breakfast.

“Don’t do that, Ronald. You’ll only annoy it.” I pay no attention and continue waving my hands about. We’ll see some truly suicidal wasp-bothering later in the day.

The breakfast underneath my waving is different today. Not that it makes any difference to the wasp. I’ve eschewed the fried stuff and joined Dolores in smoked salmon.

Alexei is pleased: “Yeah, more fried stuff for me!” Wish I could take that much pleasure in something so simple.

We watch a bit of Sunday Brunch on Dolores’s tablet until check out time. And I finish off what’s left of my beer supplies, carefully removing the labels from the bottles. OCD. I realise I demonstrate lots of OCD-like behaviour. Why else would I spend hundreds of hours messing around with brewing records? No normal person would. “Just a pity you aren’t a compulsive cleaner, Ronald.”


We’ve another appointment with Joe Stange at the festival. At a slightly different spot, so we can try some different beers, and slightly later. Happily it’s still close to lots of Czech brewery stands.

On the way, Alexei asks: “Daad,  Why did Trotsky have to leave Russia?”

It must be the Stalinist architecture around us subconsciously influencing him. “Because he fell out with Stalin. And you wouldn’t want to upset Stalin.”

We find Joe his and his American mate in the Vietnamese section. This time they’ve got their kids, matching sets of a boy and a girl, and the mate’s wife along. Alexei goes off to the Computerspielemuseum and I go off for beer. That is sort of the point of being here.

It’s not quite as hot as yesterday. But it’s still way too hot for me. Hence my urgent need for beer.

Luckily, the Rohozec stand isn’t too far away. Me and Andrew wander down there and pick up some beer. Once again, it’s something dark for me and something pale for him.


Rohozec Dunkles
Fruity, a touch of bitterness.

I’m amazed at how little trouble the kids are, as they’re around four and six years old. Maybe it’s because they’ve got someone to play with. My attempts at drinking with small kids in tow usually resulted in me spending most of my time chasing after them down the street. Not a great deal of fun


I spot some interesting stands on my next beer quest: Murphys Stout, Newcastle Brown, Strongbow, Fosters, Heineken, Singha and Carslberg. But I manage to resist those temptations and get myself a Pardubicky Porter.


Pardubicky Porter
Liquorice, caramel, sweet and meaty. Dolores: “Too malty” Well I think it’s lovely.


Every time I walk past the Vietnamese food stall I’m more tempted to buy something. Finally I crack and buy some duck. It’s pretty cheap and very nice. If a little bony. Once eaten, it’s time to hunt down some more beer.

Cvikov Svatecni
Amber colour.

You’ll see my notes are improving. And that I’m sticking with my Czech theme. It’s a pleasant enough beer. But not quite in the same class as Pardubicky Porter. Which is why I get another of those next. Has a bit more oomph.

Andrew mentioned the Russian stall to Dolores and she returns with kvass, pierogis and some sort of meat pasties. Very good, too.


A Vietnamese man nearby is having his own struggle with a wasp. He’s trying to splatter it between his palms, which seems like a guaranteed way of getting yourself stung. His wildly flailing arms only manage to knock his small son’s drink flying, soaking both the table and their food. There’s a lesson in there somewhere.

Alexei comes back from his museum visit and demands a soft drink. Fair enough in this heat. Though I’m disappointed he doesn’t want a beer. He is legal to drink in Germany.

After a couple more Porters it’s time to return to the hotel for our luggage. Which thankfully is still there and still intact.

After consulting various maps, Andrew decided the quickest and easiest way to get to the airport is to walk to Ostbahnhof and get a regional train from there. Seems fair enough. Dolores is happy, because it means avoiding Warschauerstrasse S-Bahn station, for which she’s developed an irrational hatred.


“Daad, why didn’t the Dutch colonise Australia?”

“Because they were too lazy.”

“Daad, why didn’t the Russians colonise Canada?”

“They thought it was too cold.”

There’s a sort of tradition on family holidays. At some point we always embark on a death march. We’ve left it until late this time. But in the heat and uncertainty about the route, it certainly seems like one. It seems much further than it looked on the map. There are rumblings of dissent long before we get to the station.

Where we discover there’s a long wait for the next regional train and we get the S-Bahn anyway. Now wasn’t that fun?

“It’s just like in the DDR days.” Dolores says of Schönefeld. Not sure if that’s a compliment or not. I think not. I doubt they had an Irish pub. Which is exactly where I head with Andrew. The others soon troll up, when I’m already stuck into my pint of Guinness and double Jamesons. They’ve even got English crisps, which pleases Alexei no end.

It’s a very un-German end to the trip.




Internationales Berliner Bierfestival
http://www.bierfestival-berlin.de


Computerspielemuseum Berlin
Karl-Marx-Allee 93A,
10243 Berlin.
Tel: +49 30 60988577
http://www.computerspielemuseum.de/

Thursday, 3 September 2015

Bottled Stout in the 1950's - Standard Stouts 65-70% attenuation

The biggest surprise is that I’m still rambling across the moorland of 1950’s Stout. Surely I must eventually come across a pub?

As we gradually move our way down the attenuation scale, you’ll see the FGs rise and ABVs fall. Which is only logical. Though we’ve still got a way to go down that particular road.

There’s a considerable variation in price, not always that directly related to strength. The cheapest, Greenall’s Oatmeal Stout was just 21d – 8.75p in modern money – while the dearest, Mackeson cost 32d (13.33p). That’s almost 50% more, despite there being little difference in ABV. AAs  national, heavily-advertised brand, it shouldn’t be a surprise that Mackeson demanded a premium price. The same seems to be true to a lesser extent of Charrington’s Punch Stout.

Just 5 of the 48 examples have the word “sweet” or “glucose” in their name. Almost as many, 4, are Oatmeal Stouts. More surprisingly, there are two Oyster Stouts. How modern.

There’s a reason why there are four analyses of Jubilee Stout. It was another widely available Stout which Whitbread presumably saw as a rival to their own Mackeson brand. A beer which was incredibly important for the company in the 1950’s.

There’s a very good geographical spread of breweries, from Scotland down to Southwest England, with pretty much every region inbetween represented. Including my hometown of Newark-on-Trent, in the form of Holes Castle Stout.

I can’t think of anything else to say. So here’s the table.

Bottled Stout in the 1950's - Standard Stouts 60-65% attenuation
Year Brewer Beer Price per pint d Acidity OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation colour
1953 Davenport Celebration Stout 22 0.06 1041.9 1014.7 3.52 64.92% 1 + 17
1953 Hunt Edmunds Country Stout 26 0.06 1043.8 1015.4 3.67 64.84% 1 + 15
1950 Castletown Manx Oyster Stout 26 0.07 1043.7 1015.4 3.66 64.76% 1 + 17
1953 Young & Son Victory Oyster Stout 26 0.05 1046.5 1016.4 3.89 64.73% 1R + 17B
1959 Vaux Red Label Stout 28 1043.9 1015.5 3.67 64.69% 300
1957 Boddingtons Extra Stout (lactose absent) 28 0.04 1043.9 1015.6 3.66 64.46% 250
1951 Hope & Anchor Jubilee Stout 28 0.04 1041.7 1014.9 3.46 64.27%
1953 Samuel Smith Sams Stout 22 0.11 1043.9 1015.7 3.64 64.24% 1 + 11
1952 Hammerton Oatmeal Stout 29 0.07 1047.2 1017 3.90 63.98% 1 + 18.5
1959 Nimmo Nimmo's Stout 28 1048.2 1017.4 3.98 63.90% 300
1954 Bent's  Red Label Stout 26 0.04 1049.2 1017.8 4.06 63.82% 300
1959 Plymouth Breweries Imperial Brown Stout 26 1045.1 1016.4 3.71 63.64% 350
1954 Charrington Punch Stout 30 0.04 1047.5 1017.3 3.90 63.58% 1 + 18
1955 Devenish Double Weymouth Sweet Stout 28 0.06 1042.8 1015.6 3.51 63.55% 400
1959 Devenish Devenish 28 1042.2 1015.4 3.46 63.51% 350
1953 James Hole & Co Castle Stout 24 0.06 1041 1015 3.36 63.41% 1R + 17B
1951 Birkenhead Brewery BB Stout 26 0.11 1046.6 1017.1 3.81 63.30%
1952 Hope & Anchor Jubilee Stout 28 0.06 1040.5 1014.9 3.31 63.21% 1 + 11.5
1957 Charrington Punch Stout 30 0.04 1047.2 1017.4 3.85 63.14% 270
1959 Flowers Table Stout 30 1043.3 1016 3.53 63.05% 250
1952 Hope & Anchor Jubilee Stout 26 0.05 1040.6 1015.1 3.29 62.81% 1 + 10
1950 Hope & Anchor Jubilee Stout 26 0.05 1040 1014.9 3.24 62.75% 1 + 11
1952 Groves & Whitnall Red Rose Stout 26 0.07 1047.9 1017.9 3.87 62.63% 1 + 12
1951 Truman Best Stout 22 0.06 1040.9 1015.3 3.31 62.59% 1 + 16
1951 Hammerton Oatmeal Stout 23 0.07 1046.8 1017.6 3.77 62.39% 1 + 22
1950 M???? Manchester Stout 24 0.06 1044.1 1016.6 3.55 62.36% 1 + 13
1951 Greenalls Oatmeal Stout 21 0.05 1042.7 1016.1 3.43 62.30%
1950 H???? Manchester M. Stout (HMS) 25 0.06 1047.2 1017.8 3.80 62.29% 1 + 14
1954 Plymouth Breweries Brown Imperial Stout 25 0.04 1048.6 1018.5 3.89 61.93% 375
1952 Atkinsons Punch Stout 24 0.05 1045.3 1017.3 3.61 61.81% 1R + 11B
1959 Joule Royal Stout 28 1047.1 1018 3.76 61.78% 250
1959 Wrekin MS Stout 28 1042.3 1016.2 3.37 61.70% 250
1953 Georges Glucose Stout 28 0.06 1045.5 1017.6 3.60 61.32% 1 + 11
1959 Whitbread Mackeson Stout 32 1046 1017.8 3.64 61.30% 400
1954 Calder Scotch Stout 28 0.04 1040.9 1015.9 3.23 61.12% 1 + 14
1959 Boddingtons Extra Stout 24 1043.8 1017.1 3.45 60.96% 325
1953 Charrington Punch Stout 30 0.05 1047.8 1018.7 3.76 60.88% 1 + 15
1956 Deuchar R Edinburgh Sweet Stout 30 0.04 1042.9 1016.8 3.37 60.84% 300
1954 Wilsons Wembly Extra Stout 26 0.04 1044.3 1017.4 3.47 60.72% 325
1953 John Joule Royal Stout 28 0.05 1046.3 1018.2 3.63 60.69% 1 + 16
1953 Camerons Sovereign Stout 28 0.06 1047.3 1018.6 3.70 60.68% 1 + 15
1959 Butler, Wm Black Satin Sweet Stout 29 1042.2 1016.6 3.30 60.66% 300
1959 Groves & Whitnall Red Roses Stout 25 1047.5 1018.7 3.72 60.63% 250
1954 Whitworth Son & Nephew Sweet Stout 28 0.04 1044.7 1017.6 3.50 60.63% 375
1954 Plymouth Breweries Oatmeal Stout 25 0.04 1048.7 1019.2 3.81 60.57% 400
1959 Taylor Walker Cannon Stout 29 0.04 1045.8 1018.1 3.57 60.48% 425
1952 Wilsons Extra Stout 23 0.05 1043.7 1017.4 3.39 60.18% 1R + 16B
1954 Truman Best Stout 24 0.04 1044 1017.6 3.41 60.00% 1 + 10
Average 26.54 0.05 1044.7 1016.8 3.60 62.46%
Source:
Whitbread Gravity book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number LMA/4453/D/02/002.

Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Partnership opportunity

Calling online home brewing supplies, er, suppliers. I've a partnership opportunity.

It's all part of a dramatic development - possibly the most cataclysmic event ever - here at SUABP. Get in touch via the gadget thing if you're interested.

Let's Brew Wednesday - 1955 Flowers IPA

I’m sticking with my 1950’s Flowers theme. There is sort of a point to it. No, not sort of. There is a point.

To show the full range of beers coming out of a brewery in the 1950’s. In some cases, it’s surprisingly few. Not at Flowers. They brewed at least nine beers 4 Pale Ales, and one each of IPA, Mild, Brown Ale, Strong Ale and Stout. Though, a bit like many modern English brewers, they had several Pale Ales of fairly similar gravities. One of which we’re looking at now: IPA.

I don’t know if this was a draught beer as well as bottled. But it looks very similar to a type I sometimes call “Southern IPA”. A couple of London brewers, at least, made one. Like Whitbread. Theirs from 1955 has the same gravity as this, 1034º, but is more highly attenuated and more heavily hopped*. Barclay Perkins brewed this type of low-gravity IPA, too. Though I’m not sure if it survived as long as 1955.

Talking of hopping, this is the most heavily hopped of Flowers Pale Ales, in terms of pounds per quarter. Which is the best way, as it takes gravity out of the equation. 7.5 lbs in the case of IPA, 7.25 lbs for Green Label and OB, 6 lbs for PX and LA. It’s not a huge difference, but it is there.

The recipe is uncomplicated: pale malt, sugar, malt extract and Goldings. Not a huge amount I can say about that, is there? No. 1 is a guess, as the log just says “invert”. There’s a touch of some sugar called DSI, too. No idea what that is.

Er, that’s it. Nothing left but to pass you over to me for the recipe . . . . . .





1955 Flowers IPA
pale malt 7.00 lb 93.32%
No. 1 invert 0.38 lb 5.01%
malt extract 0.13 lb 1.67%
Goldings 90 min 0.75 oz
Goldings 60 min 0.75 oz
Goldings 30 min 0.75 oz
OG 1034.2
FG 1009
ABV 3.33
Apparent attenuation 73.68%
IBU 36
SRM 11.5
Mash at 153º F
Sparge at 160º F
Boil time 90 minutes
pitching temp 60º F
Yeast WLP007 Dry English Ale



* Whitbread brewing record held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number LMA/4453/D/01/122

Tuesday, 1 September 2015

DDR Beer Styles (part two)

I realised there’s lots more information in TGL 7764 that’s interesting. Well, to me. I can’t speak for anyone else.

We’ll be looking at some of the more technical aspects. Such as which ingredients, and in which quantities, were required for each style. And stuff like packaging, shelflife and pasteurisation.

Beginning with the ingredients, I can now see a difference between Deutsches Pilsator and Deutsches Pilsner Spezial: the latter contained slightly more malt. Unsurprisingly, low-alcohol beers like Einfachbier and Doppel-Karamelbier have minimal hopping, considerably lower than even Berliner Weisse. The Pilsners and Porter had the heaviest level of hopping. Again, not really a surprise.

The other ingredients are more intriguing. Quite a bit of white sugar in Doppel-Karamelbier. Sugar colouring – I guess some sort of caramel – in Einfachbier, Doppel-Karamelbier and Porter. Plus artificial sweetener in Einfachbier. Don’t think the latter is a particularly DDR thing. They did exactly the same in the West in that class of beer. Unlike in the West, Berliner Weisse had to contain at least 30% wheat malt in the DDR.

I can’t believe this is the first time that I’ve noticed the bit about Dekkera bruxellensis (another name for Brettanomyces bruxellensis) in Porter. In "Leitfaden für den Brauer und Mälzer" (Dickscheit , 1953) has a description of Porter brewing that includes a secondary Brettanomyces fermentation in wood. It says this isn’t necessarily how Porter was brewed in the DDR, but was the proper method for the style. That caveat had me doubting whether Brettanomyces was ever used. This seems to confirm that it was.

DDR beer styles
lagering time (days)
label colour shelf life (days) pasteurised? standard minimum
Einfachbier brown 6 N
Weissbier dark green not specified N
Hell yellow 8 N 20 12
Schwarzbier red and black 15 N
Doppel-Karamelbier blue 30 Y
Deutsches Pilsner light green 10 N 25 15
Diabetiker-Pils white 30 Y
Deutsches Pilsator anything 18 N 50 30
Deutsches Pilsner Spezial anything 90 Y 50 30
Märzen light grey 30 Y
Weißer Bock oder Bockbier Hell wine red 10 N 30 18
Dunkler Bock oder Bockbier Dunkel wine red 10 N 30 18
Deutscher Porter carmine red 24 N
Source:
"Technologie für Brauer und Mälzer" by Wolfgang Kunze, 1975, pages 419 -  425.

Now some mostly packaging-related stuff. I love the way labels were colour-coded by style. If you think this is just a totalitarian thing, try taking a look at some modern beer labels. Pilsner ones are often green.

The life expectancy of bottled beer was pretty short. I can remember Eisenacher Hell being particularly unstable. Best to drink it on the way back from the shop. It didn’t matter too much because most beer was consumed close to where it was produced. And, as in the Czech Republic, people didn’t leave beer lying around at home.

The exception to this were the types that were pasteurised. And Berliner Weisse, for which there was no sell by date. As a naturally-conditioned beer, it could last pretty much forever. I’ve had bottles that were over 30 years old and still perfectly drinkable.

The lagering times look very short to me. Though I’m sure they’re longer than most industrial breweries now bother with. 30 days doesn’t seem long for Bock. Personally, I’d go for at least double that, preferably four times.

DDR beer styles
malt kg/hl max min hops g/hl white sugar kg/hl max sugar colouring kg/hl max crystal sweetener g/hl max salt g/hl max special ingredients
Einfachbier 4.5 40 0.2 8
Weissbier 14.5 80 Min. 30% wheat malt, Lactobacillus delbruckii
Hell 17 180
Schwarzbier 19 230
Doppel-Karamelbier 10.5 40 6 0.35
Deutsches Pilsner 20 250
Diabetiker-Pils 18 300
Deutsches Pilsator 20 300
Deutsches Pilsner Spezial 21 300
Märzen 24 240
Weißer Bock oder Bockbier Hell 26 180
Dunkler Bock oder Bockbier Dunkel 26 150
Deutscher Porter 34 500 0.45 100 Dekkera bruxellensis
Source:
"Technologie für Brauer und Mälzer" by Wolfgang Kunze, 1975, pages 419 -  425.


Finally, I love this little note about what couldn’t go on a label:

"Fantasy names, which suggest a higher quality, such as:

Edel, Doppel (with the exception of Doppel-Karamelbier), Extra, Exquisit, das Feinste, aus bestem Malz und Hopfen bereitet, are not allowed."
"Technologie für Brauer und Mälzer" by Wolfgang Kunze, 1975, page  426.

There are lots of labels today that would fall foul of that rule.

Monday, 31 August 2015

Draught Bitter in 1960

Table time again. The words are still rationed, owing to me having spoken too much last weekend. I don’t have an infinite supply of these things, you know.

Having obtained some fresh, juicy numbers, courtesy of Boak and Bailey, I thought I’d do something with them. As 1960 marks the end of the period I’m currently focussing on, it seems a good excuse to take a look at the state of British beer then.

Boak and Bailey’s data came from a Which? Report into beer from 1960. It’s hard to imagine how much in the dark drinkers were about the strength of the beer back then. Brewers were very secretive about how strong their beer was. With good reason. Their reflex reaction to tax increases  had long been to cut gravities. By not telling their customers about gravities, they hoped they might not notice their beer was getting weaker.

This report and the occasional newspaper article were the only times beer strengths were ever detailed. I know kicking CAMRA is a modern sport, but it was they who dragged beer gravities out into the open. In the late 1970’s, as brewers wouldn’t say how strong their beers were, CAMRA had them analysed themselves. And published the results in the Good Beer Guide. Once the information was out in the open, some brewers started to publish their gravities. Eventually legislation obliged them to include it on beer labels.

But back in the dark days of 1970, the only way to get an idea of the strength of a beer was its name and price. Though those indicators weren’t 100% reliable. There are plenty of examples of Best Bitter in the tables below that aren’t very best. They range from 1032º to 1048º. As average gravity was around 1037º at this time, I would expect a Best Bitter to be stronger than that.

You’ll notice that several beers appear in both tables. I’m reassured that the prices mostly match, as do the gravities to within a few percentage points.

The bitterness number which appears in the Which? Table is something called “Index of Hop Bitter”. Not sure exactly what that is, but it doesn’t look far off an IBU number to me. Perhaps a touch lower. It amuses me that one of the beers with the highest bitterness is From William Younger, a Scottish brewery. Weren’t they supposed to use almost no hops in Scotland?

There’s a huge variation in value for money, as indicated by the final column, which gives the price in pennies of 1% ABV.  I’m pleased to see that the winner of this particular race, by a whisker, is Carlisle State Management. A nationalised brewery. And it’s reassuring to see that by far the worst value for money is a keg beer, Flowers Bitter. You’ll note that the average price per % ABV is very similar for both tables, 4.21d and 4.22d.

That’s me done. I’ll leave you with the lovely tables.

Draught Bitter in 1960
Brewer Beer Price per pint d OG FG ABV atten-uation bitterness price per % ABV
Ansells Bitter 17 1045.3 1010.7 4.50 76.38% 31 3.78
Worthington  "E" 18 1041.8 1006.5 4.60 84.45% 28 3.91
Bass Red Triangle 18 1043.1 1008.5 4.50 80.28% 34 4.00
Carlisle State Management Bitter 14 1038.2 1008.2 3.90 78.53% 28 3.59
Charrington India Pale Ale 19 1044.9 1013.25 4.10 70.49% 37 4.63
Courage & Barclay Bitter 17 1040.3 1010.25 3.90 74.57% 40 4.36
Flowers Keg Bitter 22 1039.1 1012.8 3.40 67.26% 33 6.47
Fremlins Best Bitter 21 1044.7 1009.3 4.60 79.19% 34 4.56
Friary Meux Bitter 13 1034.9 1007.2 3.60 79.37% 28 3.61
Georges Bitter 13 1030.9 1004.75 3.40 84.63% 24 3.82
Greenall Whitley Bitter 14 1034.4 1005.95 3.70 82.70% 40 3.78
Greene King Bitter 15 1037.0 1006.25 4.00 83.11% 33 3.75
Hammond United Best Bitter 16 1035.5 1004.05 4.10 88.59% 20 3.90
Ind Coope Bitter (BB) 15 1037.7 1008.4 3.80 77.72% 36 3.94
John Smiths Best Bitter 16 1036.8 1010.55 3.40 71.33% 40 4.71
Tennant Best Bitter 16 1038.3 1006.05 4.20 84.20% 30 3.81
Tennant Queen's Ale 18 1041.7 1008.6 4.30 79.38% 35 4.18
Thwaites Bitter 16 1035.8 1006.6 3.80 81.56% 32 4.21
Truman Bitter 16 1037.6 1007.6 3.90 79.79% 30 4.10
Ushers Bitter 13 1031.9 1008.75 3.00 72.57% 25 4.33
Vaux Best Bitter 15 1034.8 1005.6 3.80 83.91% 22 3.95
Watney Special Bitter 19 1043.1 1014.5 3.70 66.36% 33 5.14
Whitbread Bitter 17 1037.4 1009.65 3.60 74.20% 35 4.72
Wilson Bitter 15 1036.1 1006.1 3.90 83.10% 35 3.84
Younger, Wm. Bitter 18 1043.9 1010.8 4.30 75.40% 40 4.19
Average
16.44 1038.6 1008.4 3.92 78.36% 32.12 4.21
Source:
Which Beer Report, 1960, pages 171 - 173.


Draught Bitter in 1960
Brewer Year Price per pint d OG FG ABV atten-uation Colour price per % ABV
Bass Bitter 21 1044 1009.8 4.45 77.73% 19 4.72
Beasley Bitter 15 1034.3 1004.5 3.72 86.88% 35 4.03
Blatch Brewery Bitter 14 1031.8 1003.9 3.49 87.74% 20 4.01
Burt & Co. Best Bitter 13 1032.6 1004.5 3.51 86.20% 20 3.70
Charles Wells  Bitter 18 1034.4 1006.6 3.48 80.81% 18 5.18
Charrington  Ordinary Bitter 14 1033.8 1008 3.35 76.33% 18 4.18
Charrington  Best Bitter 19 1044.5 1012.9 4.10 71.01% 24 4.64
Clinch Bitter 13 1034 1006.1 3.49 82.06% 20 3.73
Courage & Barclay Directors' Bitter 24 1048.8 1008.4 5.27 82.79% 26 4.56
Courage & Barclay Bitter 17 1040.4 1009.1 4.07 77.48% 23 4.18
Courage & Barclay Alton Pale Ale 17 1040.4 1009.4 4.03 76.73% 25 4.22
Dunmow Brewery Bitter 14 1033.6 1006.6 3.37 80.36% 25 4.15
Flowers Bitter 19 1040.6 1008.8 3.97 78.33% 24 4.78
Fremlin XXX Bitter 14 1035.5 1005.7 3.72 83.94% 26 3.76
Friary Bitter 14 1033.8 1005.2 3.57 84.62% 20 3.92
Friary Meux Treble Gold 18 1042.3 1008.9 4.18 78.96% 23 4.31
Fullers London Pride 20 1042.3 1010.5 4.13 75.18% 24 4.85
Fullers Ordinary Bitter 16 1032.2 1005.3 3.50 83.54% 24 4.58
Garne & Sons Best Bitter 17 1042.9 1009.5 4.18 77.86% 30 4.07
Garne & Sons Bitter 13 1031.2 1004.3 3.36 86.22% 21 3.87
Gibbs Mew Blue Keg Bitter 18 1036 1007.6 3.55 78.89% 25 5.07
Gray's Bitter 13 1033.6 1006.1 3.44 81.85% 21 3.78
Greene King Abbot Ale 22 1051.3 1007.9 5.43 84.60% 20 4.06
Greene King Best Bitter 15 1038.4 1007.4 3.88 80.73% 20 3.87
Greene King Ordinary Bitter 13 1033.9 1005.7 3.53 83.19% 26 3.69
Harvey's Bitter 14 1033.8 1006.1 3.46 81.95% 22 4.04
Ind Coope Double Diamond 19 1040.2 1010 3.92 75.12% 22 4.85
McMullen Best Bitter 16 1041.1 1010.8 3.79 73.72% 25 4.22
McMullen Ordinary Bitter 15 1037 1008 3.63 78.38% 22 4.14
Mew Langton Best Bitter 18 1037 1008.6 3.55 76.76% 19 5.07
Morland Bitter 14 1035.6 1006.1 3.69 82.87% 18 3.80
Morrell Best Bitter 15 1035.3 1005.3 3.75 84.99% 23 4.00
Morrell Light Bitter 12 1030.7 1005 3.21 83.71% 17 3.74
Rayments Best Bitter 14 1035.7 1006.4 3.66 82.07% 22 3.82
Rayments Bitter 12 1030.3 1004.1 3.27 86.47% 18 3.66
Ridley Best Bitter 21 1047 1007.8 4.90 83.40% 22 4.29
Ridley Ordinary Bitter 14 1034.2 1009.8 3.05 71.35% 19 4.59
Simonds Best Bitter 19 1042.3 1007.5 4.35 82.27% 17 4.37
Simpson & Co. Bitter 15 1036.2 1008 3.53 77.90% 24 4.26
Star Brewery SPA 17 1039.5 1005.8 4.21 85.32% 22 4.04
Star Brewery Bitter 12 1029.5 1003.3 3.28 88.81% 20 3.66
Tamplin Bitter 14 1034.3 1006 3.54 82.51% 24 3.96
Tetley Bitter 16 1037.9 1003.7 4.28 90.24% 20 3.74
Tollemache Bitter 16 1033.3 1003.4 3.74 89.79% 20 4.28
Truman Best Burton Bitter 18 1042.7 1009.7 4.29 77.28% 19 4.20
Truman Ordinary Burton Bitter 16 1037.4 1007.6 3.87 79.68% 20 4.13
Usher Ordinary Bitter 13 1032.5 1007.3 3.15 77.54% 18 4.13
Usher, Trowbridge Best Bitter 18 1043.6 1010 4.20 77.06% 21 4.29
Watney Special Bitter 19 1044.2 1009.6 4.50 78.28% 26 4.22
Wells & Winch Bitter 16 1036 1010.3 3.21 71.39% 12 4.98
Wenlock Bitter 16 1035 1008.7 3.41 75.14% 26 4.69
Whitbread Bitter 17 1038.5 1011 3.56 71.43% 20 4.77
Young & Co Best Bitter 20 1048.4 1011.5 4.61 76.24% 24 4.34
Young & Co Ordinary Bitter 15 1037.5 1006.6 3.86 82.40% 19 3.88
Average
16.15 1037.7 1007.4 3.818 80.52% 21.81 4.22
Source:
Whitbread Gravity book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number LMA/4453/D/02/002.

I’ve a few other types of beer to plough through. Unless I get distracted.