Monday, 14 December 2020

Scottish Mild in WW II (part three)

One final post on Younger's WW II Milds. It's been a roller-coaster ride. I'm still high from the adrenaline.

I’m going to concentrate on the grists of XXX now. For a good reason. The other two, X and XX, pretty much exclusively parti-gyled with XXX. While XX was quite often brewed single-gyle. Also, there were far fewer brews of X and XX than XXX. Given how volatile recipes were in the middle of the war, XX offers better opportunities for tracking them all.

Having kicked off the war with grits, a form of maize, as their adjunct of choice, there were bound to be big changes. The war cut off imports of maize and brewers dependent on it had to look for alternatives. Initially, that was flaked rice. Ultimately, flaked barley. Inbetween a variety of other adjuncts were employed. Often more than one at the same time.

There’s nothing very complicated about the malt bill. It’s simply pale malt, crystal malt and the mysterious “M”. I’m really not sure what it was. The one log where they spell it out fully, I can’t read it. Though there are a couple which say Munich, so perhaps that’s what it is. Or possibly melanoidin malt.

The rise in the proportion of base malt is down to a reduction in the amount of adjuncts employed. Pre-war, most of Younger’s beers were around 45% grits. The largest percentage of adjuncts I’ve seen. More than 15% unmalted grains was unheard of at most breweries.

The sugars are also a bit tricky to pin down. One is simply described as “invert”, the other is a proprietary sugar called CWA. As invert only appears in dark beers, my money is on it being No. 3. But I could be wrong.

All I really know about CWA is that it was a starch conversion syrup, i.e., an enzymatic syrup. I’m assuming some sort of diastatic malt extract, like DME. Malt extract of this type were surprisingly common in the middle of the 20th century.

William Younger XXX Ale malt and sugar 1939 - 1944
Date Year OG pale malt crystal malt M malt invert CWA
17th Nov 1939 1037 45.00% 6.00% 6.00% 2.00% 2.00%
19th Sep 1940 1036 48.11% 5.66% 5.66% 1.89% 1.89%
13th Mar 1941 1035 45.92% 6.12% 6.12% 4.08% 4.08%
9th Dec 1941 1036 62.26% 5.66% 5.66% 1.89% 1.89%
26th Dec 1941 1035 59.43% 5.66% 5.66% 3.77%  
23rd Jan 1942 1034 60.00% 6.00% 6.00% 4.00%  
24th Apr 1942 1033 57.45% 6.38% 6.38% 0.00% 4.26%
15th Jul 1942 1033 72.00% 6.00% 6.00% 4.00%  
8th Aug 1942 1033 72.00%   12.00% 4.00%  
11th Dec 1942 1033 63.46% 11.54% 5.77% 3.85% 3.85%
4th Nov 1943 1033 66.00%   12.00% 2.00% 2.00%
9th Nov 1943 1033 63.83% 6.38% 6.38% 2.13% 2.13%
14th Jan 1943 1033 60.58%   11.54% 3.85% 3.85%
9th Apr 1944 1033 57.45%   12.77% 2.13% 2.13%
Sources:
William Younger brewing records held at the Scottish Brewing Archive, document numbers WY/6/1/2/76, WY/6/1/2/77, WY/6/1/2/78 , WY/6/1/2/79 and WY/6/1/2/81.


The following table shows how much the adjuncts used by Younger bounced around during the war. This wasn’t specific to their Milds. Every style used the adjunct of the day. The biggest surprise is that grits were still featuring as late as 1942. Maize disappeared from most UK brews in 1940.

Most breweries went through adjuncts in this order during the war: flaked maize, flaked rice, flaked barley, flaked oats and finally flaked barley again. Younger did things quite differently, using a couple of adjuncts simultaneously – for example, grits and flaked rice – and used a couple I’ve noy encountered elsewhere. Namely chit barley and ground barley. Though the latter I have seen mentioned in other technical sources.


William Younger XXX Ale adjuncts 1939 - 1944
Date Year OG flaked rice grits flaked barley chit barley ground barley flaked rye flaked oat
17th Nov 1939 1037   39.00%          
19th Sep 1940 1036 19.81% 16.98%          
13th Mar 1941 1035 15.31% 18.37%          
9th Dec 1941 1036   16.98%   5.66%      
26th Dec 1941 1035   16.98%     8.49%    
23rd Jan 1942 1034   18.00%     6.00%    
24th Apr 1942 1033   19.15%     6.38%    
15th Jul 1942 1033     12.00%        
8th Aug 1942 1033     12.00%        
11th Dec 1942 1033           11.54%  
4th Nov 1943 1033     6.00%       12.00%
9th Nov 1943 1033     19.15%        
14th Jan 1943 1033     20.19%        
9th Apr 1944 1033     25.53%        
Sources:
William Younger brewing records held at the Scottish Brewing Archive, document numbers WY/6/1/2/76, WY/6/1/2/77, WY/6/1/2/78 , WY/6/1/2/79 and WY/6/1/2/81.

 

 

1 comment:

Barm said...

Would there have been a British maltster producing melanoidin malt or Munich malt in 1941? It seems unlikely.