Saturday, 17 July 2010

Philadelphia question

This isn't so much a post as a request for help. We'll be in the States next month. And will need to get from Newark Airport to Philadelphia.

Here's the question. Would a train ticket be cheaper if I bought it in advance rather than just at the station when I get there?

14 comments:

First Stater said...

I don't believe there are discounts for early purchase. There is an upcharge for purchasing your ticket on the train v. at the station. I'd look into both Amtrak and NJ transit. I suspect the NJ transit will be more economical but requires a change in Trenton to the SEPTA system for the ride into Philly. Might you find time for a beer in your journey? I'm down the road in Delaware. And if you want to bring a few bottles of Westy 12 along I'll gladly purchase them from you.

www.njtransit.com
www.septa.org

Velky Al said...

Planning an IPA correction tour? ;)

Ed Carson said...

As far as I can tell, you are spending up to $20 more buying at the door from Amtrak.The prices change according to times and dates of travel. A less expensive option may be to take Transit of New Jersey(TNJ) to Trenton and then Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportion Authority(Septa) to Philadelphia. What's the reason you are coming to my town?

Ron Pattinson said...

Ed, I'll be there to show my family the city. And possibly drink the odd beer.

Matt said...

I spent a day in Philadelphia eight years ago, halfway through an east coast baseball trip. After an afternoon Phillies game, we went to a brewpub in the basement of a hotel/convention centre near Independence Hall, can't remember what it was called but the beer was pretty decent from what I recall.

And of course, you can't go to Philly without having a cheesesteak.

Al Duvall said...

Your best bargain is to take the NJ Transit train south to Trenton, then change to a SEPTA train to Philadelphia. That will drop you off closer to the center of town as well.

Jack Curtin said...

All the suggestions to use NJ Transit and then SEPTA are correct. This will take you to 30th St. station just as Amtrak would. Much cheaper than Amtrak and the connections are usually good enough that it's almost as fast.

Ed Carson said...

I'm going to presume you are going to visit the historic sites. Around there, the odd beer is available at National Mechanics(Third & Market),Eulogy(Second & Chestnut), The Khyber Pass(on Second btw Market & Chestnut) and Sugar Mom's(on Church Street behind Christ Church). After you've been compelled to run up the Art Museum steps, refreshment is available at Brigid's(24th & Aspen), The Bishop's Collar(24th & Fairmount), London Grille(23rd & Fairmount) and The Belgian Cafe(21st and Green).
And for your sons, I would recommend a visit to The Mütter Museum.

Leif BJorke said...

NJ Transit will be cheaper, but will require transfers and take substantially longer. Buy ahead and make a reservation.

Make sure to try Stoudt's American Pale Ale. It's brewed not too far from Philadelphia. It's good stuff.

Anonymous said...

Amtrak be maddeningly unreliable except for the Accela service. Once you get to Philly, the SEPTA system is good for the usual tourist locations and is often more efficient than driving.

If you want to get out into the suburbs, especially the modern suburban sprawl, you might need to rent a car or hire a taxi.

Beware Pennsylvania's peculiar beer laws if you intend to buy bottled beer to take home. If you don't buy by the case, you must pay substantially higher prices for single bottles or six-packs at "bottle shops" which are forced to masquerade as restaurants.

Eastern Pennsylvania is probably one of the richest areas in the U.S. for good beer. Stoudt's, Nodding Head, Yards, Victory, Sly Fox and a number of brewpubs are all in the area.

Gary Gillman said...

I don't think anyone has mentioned the large city market downtown, in a covered structure. Excellent for the family especially on a Saturday. Picturseque with lots of different food stores and small eateries.

I would try the roast turkey stand, or seafood counter, or especially the hoagie spot. Hoagies are a cold cuts sandwich, which is made to order as you walk alongside a counter where the meats are piled up behind glass. Not to be missed. Two should be more than enough for four people.

For beer, many good suggestions have been given. I like Monk's Cafe and also, Grey Lodge which is a true beer hang out, and always has cask beer available:

http://www.greylodge.com/

One way to combine general tourism and beer is in the restored 1700's house, now a restaurant and bar, near Independence Hall, where Yard's beers are available.

Gary

Gary Gillman said...

Carmen's hoagies in the Reading Terminal Market (the main city market)!

http://www.readingterminalmarket.org/merchants/view/52

Gary

Ed Carson said...

In honor of your visit, I am sending you some tables from " A Handbook of Industrial Organic Chemistry..." (1912) by Samuel Phillip Sadtler: http://books.google.com/books?id=FGIJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA197&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U05wwilBfFgMCH49W7eoQkJOlLyTA&ci=4%2C7%2C988%2C1188&edge=0. Or I hope I am.

Mike Reeves said...

SEPTA would be the better choice as you can be dropped off downtown, either Suburban or Market East Station, depending upon where you're staying. 30th St. Station is across the river from downtown and a bit of a walk.

Philly's a great place for beer. Stop by Eulogy (136 Chestnut in Old Philly), Monks (15th and Spruce) for long list of Belgians, or head up to the Standard Tap (2nd and Poplar in Northern Liberties) for local brews.