Sunday, 7 October 2018

Crowley AK 1914 - 1919

By popular request - well, one person asked - more on AK. Surely you find the topic as endlessly fascinating as I? If not, what the fuck are you doing reading my blog? Where AK in one form or another is always bound to pop up every now and again.

This particular KK is from Crowley of Alton in Hampshire. Hand on, I'll just consult Barber to see what the hell happened to them.

Founded 1763, bought by Watney 1947, closed 1970. So I only missed it by a couple of years. Not that I was likely to have been down that way. Still never have, for that matter.

The table covers the years of WW I. Whay is that? Because those are the years I have for Crowley. I didn't harvest the records I have myself. They were passed on to me by Edd Mather (thanks, Edd). It is a good illustration of what happened to UK beer in WW I. Bit of a drop in gravity in the first two years, then all sorts of craziness in the last two.

It looks to me that they were deliberately boosting the attenuation in the later war years to keep AK at least vaguely intoxicating. Though the attenuation was never much under 75%.

The hopping rate was fairly constantly around 6 lbs per quarter of malt (looking at the hops per quarter rate effectivley takes the strength of the beer out of the equation). Though after 1915 the hops became progressivley older. In 1919 they were still using Oregon hops from the 1912 harvest.

Grists next. Very illustrative of the war they are, too.

Crowley AK 1914 - 1919
Date Year OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation lbs hops/ qtr hops lb/brl
16th Jun 1914 1047.1 1011.1 4.76 76.47% 6.25 1.10
7th Jan 1915 1045.7 1008.9 4.87 80.61% 6.39 1.19
7th Jan 1916 1042.9 1011.1 4.21 74.19% 5.08 0.87
13th Jan 1916 1041.6 1011.1 4.03 73.33% 5.17 0.82
22nd May 1917 1033.2 1006.6 3.52 80.00% 6.19 0.83
10th Jul 1917 1036.0 1007.2 3.81 80.00% 7.00 0.99
1st Jan 1918 1033.2 1009.4 3.15 71.67% 6.25 0.83
4th Jun 1918 1030.5 1006.1 3.22 80.00% 5.85 0.70
23rd July 1918 1027.7 1002.8 3.30 90.00% 6.00 0.64
26th Sep 1918 1030.5 1006.6 3.15 78.18% 5.69 0.69
12th Feb 1919 1034.6 1006.6 3.70 80.80% 6.00 0.85
12th May 1919 1036.0 1007.2 3.81 80.00% 6.00 0.86
Source:
Brewing record held at Hampshire Archives and Local Studies, document number 37M86/2.




3 comments:

oldbobscoo said...

90% attenuation seems pretty unusual for British yeast, unless they have a magic touch of some kind.

Brando V said...

7 year old hops? Not sure if any AA would've survived to that point.But I guarantee they would've added plenty of Limburger notes...

StuartP said...

That's an heroic effort to keep some alcoholly goodness in their low-gravity beers in 1918. Bravo!