Saturday, 4 August 2018

Let's Brew - 1964 Eldridge Pope Double Stout

Yet another Eldridge Pope recipe that I’ve had to fiddle with. Another reason to thank the Whitbread Gravity Book.

There’s an entry from 1959 for something called Double Sweet Stout. The OG is a few points higher than in the brewing record, but what swung it for me was the FG. Which was also several points higher. That says one thing to me: lactose at racking time. Which is what I’ve assumed.

Elsewhere in the grist, there’s chocolate and crystal malt, plus the usual sugar and malt extract. You may have noticed that the basic recipes for all a brewery’s beers are usually pretty similar. It makes sense not to have too many different ingredients. And when you’re parti-gyling, there’s not much choice.

The recipe is an interesting mixture of bitterness and lactose sweetness. Looks like a winner to me.



1964 Eldridge Pope Double Stout
pale malt 4.50 lb 46.97%
crystal malt 60 L 1.50 lb 15.66%
chocolate malt 1.25 lb 13.05%
malted oats 0.33 lb 3.44%
malt extract 0.33 lb 3.44%
lactose 0.50 lb 5.22%
brown sugar 0.67 lb 6.99%
white sugar 0.50 lb 5.22%
Fuggles 90 min 1.25 oz
Goldings 30 min 1.25 oz
OG 1043
FG 1019
ABV 3.18
Apparent attenuation 55.81%
IBU 32
SRM 34
Mash at 147º F
Sparge at 165º F
Boil time 90 minutes
pitching temp 59º F
Yeast WLP099 Super High Gravity Thomas Hardy

This is another recipe from my excellent new book on British beeer after WW II:

http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/austerity/23181344



4 comments:

Raoul Duke said...

Yum Yum...!

A Brew Rat said...

Seems criminal that a beer with that low of an original gravity would be called a double.

Neeall said...

I know this is asked a lot but what determined the yeast choice for this?

Ron Pattinson said...

Neeall,

because that's the Eldridge Pope yeast strain. Hardy Ale was one of their beers.