Sunday, 11 March 2018

UK beer exports by destination 1890 - 1921

Perspective is an interesting thing. Especially with regard to our own personal event horizon. The point in the past we personally experienced. Or drank, turning the thought to beer.

There are other limits. In my mind, the 1890's and 1920's are two different worlds. Yet there were only 30 years apart. That's as long as I've lived in Amsterdam. Not that long, really. But I still find the Berwers' Almanacks from the 1920s a bit weird, the way they stretch back to Victoria's reign.

Still obsessing over my latest book of numbers acquisition. Desperate for quick posts.looking to point out the same points again. Any or all of these could be true. And the motivation behind this post. Or I've had an Abt too many.

The numbers do subtly make some points. The decline in the Australasian and South African markets just before WW I. The robustness of demand in India. Doubtless thirsty squaddies. Then there's the weird total collapse of sales to the USA in 1919. How do you explain that?

UK beer exports by destination 1890 - 1921
Country 1890 1900 1910 1919 1920 1921
United States 48,991 47,700 69,688 28 - -
Egypt 6,591 18,597 20,000 10,408 9,796 11,600
British Possessions in S. Africa 25,582 31,446 5,937 464 3,302 1,233
British W. Indies and Guiana 26,882 18,794 21,726 5,159 13,688 6,483
India 97,196 94,918 96,914 23,776 60,751 45,554
Straits Settlements - - - 7,928 22,063 6,588
Australasia and N.Z. 147,014 96,785 90,416 5,291 18,199 11,170
Other Countries 150,565 202,605 285,065 177,642 262,449 177,042
Total 502,921 510,845 590,346 231,673 390,248 259,670
Source:
Brewers' Almanack 1922, page 114.

8 comments:

Mick said...

The collapse of sales in 1919 does seem rather strange but American beer production was rising rapidly.

Table 2: Industry Production, the Number of Breweries, and Average Brewery Size

1865-1915

Year National Production (millions of barrels) Number of Breweries Average Brewery Size (thousands of barrels)
1865 3.7 2,252 1,643
1870 6.6 3,286 2,009
1875 9.5 2,783 3,414
1880 13.3 2,741 4,852
1885 19.2 2,230 8,610
1890 27.6 2,156 12,801
1895 33.6 1,771 18,972
1900 39.5 1,816 21,751
1905 49.5 1,847 26,800
1910 59.6 1,568 38,010
1915 59.8 1,345 44,461
Source: United States Brewers Association, 1979 Brewers Almanac, Washington DC: 12-13.

You like figures Ron, there's plenty here..

https://eh.net/encyclopedia/a-concise-history-of-americas-brewing-industry/

Richard said...

Prohibition in the USA?

Unknown said...

The USA market collapse in 1919 could be explained by certainty of the advent Prohibition coming to pass the folowing year perhaps?

Ron Pattinson said...

Richard & Ross,

it was a joke. Obviously it was due to Prohibition.

Mike in NSW said...

The decline in exports to Australia likely coincided with the maturing of the Australian industry at the time, particularly the formation of Carlton United Breweries in Victoria at the beginning of the century, and the growth of Tooheys and Tooths in New South Wales. This led to a more reliable range of product brewed in modern breweries and distributed by new rail lines and motor transport.

Backed by inputs such as improved farming methods and maltings like the massive Mittagong Maltings (built and massively extended from 1899 to 1916).

Sic1314 said...

Surprising how quickly exports got going again by 1919/20, did rationing get relaxed almost immediately post armistice?

Ron Pattinson said...

Sic1314,

there never was rationing as such of beer. Only limits on the amount that could be produced.

Ron Pattinson said...

Mike in NSW,

I believe it was import duties after Confederation (intended to boost local production) that caused the drop.