Monday, 28 October 2013

Bottled beer - more random stuff

More random stuff I found looking for "bottled beer" in the newspaper archive.

First, a reference to King's Ale:

King's Ale Sold for New Infirmary Fund.

There was an unusual ceremony at the annual assembly of the Aberdeen Licensed Trade Association in the Bon-Accord Hotel, Aberdeen, last night. A bottle of King ale, one of the last from the 500 barrels brewed by King Edward at Burton-on-Trent in 1902, was put up for auction in aid of Lord Provost Lewis's Fund for the new Infirmary. The bottle presented by Mrs A. D. Hay, whose son, Mr W D. Hay, was the auctioneer.

The bottle was sold in snow-ball fashion, and there were numerous sums realised ranging from five shillings to £2, ladies prominent among the bidders. At the end of the sale Mrs Hay rang up the Lord Provost, and delighted him with the information that the sale had realised £21. The ale finally went to Mr W. D. Hay, at final bid of £2."
Aberdeen Journal - Wednesday 18 January 1928, page 6.
As there are still bottles of the thing knocking around, that definitely wasn't one of the last bottles. I should know - I drank some just last year. And King Edward didn't actually brew it, just symbolically press a button or something.

This one is to show that there's nothing new about pub violence. And a reminder of how dangerous a weapon a bottle can be:

A serious assault with a bottle on fellow woodcutter was admitted by James Christie, woodcutter, Hillhead, Auchattie. Banchory- Ternan, in Stonehaven Sheriff Court yesterday.

Christie pleaded guilty to having, on Augast 31, High Street. Banchory, assaulted William Gregor, woodcutter, Clune Sawmills, Durris, by striking him on the face with a bottle.

It was slated that the beer bottle was wielded with such force that it was completely shattered, and two other men who were nearby were cut by flying fragments. Gregor's cheek w«s cut in two places, and one cut required two stitches. Another stitch had to be inserted in a cut on his eyebrow.

Christie said that he struck the blow self-defence. A fine of £3 was paid in court."
Aberdeen Journal - Thursday 19 September 1935, page 5.

It's a shame there's nothing said about the runup to the attack. If Christie claimed he acted in self defence, what had Gregor done?

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