Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Calling professional brewers

Oi, professional brewers! I want to ask you something.

I'm trying to get some idea of how many recipes featured in this blog or in my books have been brewed professionally.If you've brewed one (or more) could you let me know? I've no ulterior motive. Just being nosy, really.

10 comments:

Joe W said...

I haven't brewed your recipes, but I use them - especially the ones from the 1950s onward - to research how British ales are brewed (I don't trust my fellow Americans on the subject) and create my own recipes. I regularly mash my session beers at low temperatures and use sugar syrups my in British-ish ales, which are two practices that I learned here.

Velky Al said...

As well as the Barclay's Lager, Jason brewed a London Stout based on a 1904 Whitbread recipe:

http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/devils-backbone-ramseys-1904-stout/123011/88488/

Alan said...

Brewing our 11th next week.

ealusceop said...

At Brassereire artisanale Albion, we so far brewed a Keeping Porter from Barclay Perkins's recipes (from your book Porter, a mix between 1848 Hhd Porter and 1859 Hhd recipes)(Currently aging in hogshead) Also, an East India Pale Ale, recipe from the brewery Reid's, 1839. (Currently in "hot-maturation process") And last, a X ale from the 1830's, but this is mix from many recipes, but mainly from Griffin Brewery.

Jazz said...

I have all the malt to brew a batch of the St. Stephen's 1834 Porter, just waiting for a 7 bbl fermenter to open up. I can't get my hands on invert sugar in large enough quantities to brew a lot of the other recipes.

Rod said...

Ron - as you know, I brewed the Lovibonds' 1864 XXXX at the Old Brewery Greenwich last February, exactly as possible from your recipe. It got three months' maturation, like the original and fell beautifully bright without fining. We had it on draught, where it sold very well - it's a beer I would certainly consider brewing again sometime.
As you also know, there are 6 x 75cl bottles under lock and key in my cellar at The Old Brewery, and I hope you are going to come and try some when you come over for the GBBF in early August.
I shall be very surprised if I don't brew your recent recipe for Barclay Perkins' Export Double Brown Stout at some point this Winter.

Kristen England said...

I've had a ton of inquires to our recipes from pro guys also. The most of them are similar to Joe and use them mostly for reference. Some like taking the grist, changing it slightly and using it. Most change it only based on the things they have in hand. Only a select few actually find a lot of the specific ingredients.

Damo @ Summit Brewing Co just did used some of our info from our 1909! book to make their Golden Sovereign. He took a different turn and used all brand new ingredients and it was excellent. Dave @ Schell's Brewery just did a Burton and is loosely based on our stuff.

My new brewery will definitely brewing a lot of these historic recipes. We'll be doing a historic Scottish light (60 if you must) as one of our main line up of beers to boot. Hopefully they will be in enough places so a lot of the fans of this blog will get a chance to try some of them. The plane is to bring a few to the GBBF next year or so.

For those you're interested:
www.pourdecisionsbrewery.com

Anonymous said...

We've brewed (and continue to brew regularly) the Trumans 1890 Export Stout, pretty straight from your version. We've used other recipes you have posted/ printed as references / guides.

Evin
The Kernel Brewery

Ron Pattinson said...

Evin, maybe I should try to drop by the brewery when I'm in London for the GBBF.

Anonymous said...

Please do drop in. You are welcome at any time.

Evin