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Saturday, 23 March 2019

Let's Brew - 1939 Whitbread Mackeson Stout

One of Whitbread’s most popular beers was their Milk Stout, Mackeson. They had acquired the brand when they bought the eponymous brewery in Hythe in Kent.

Mackeson was the inventor of Milk Stout – Stout with added lactose – releasing the first version in 1909. The concept was to create a more nourishing version of Stout. It’s debatable whether that’s true, but the new beer was a hit with drinkers.

Mackeson was savvy enough to patent their idea but, as they weren’t large enough to meet demand for the new style themselves, they allowed other brewers to produce their own version under licence. Mackeson, however, remained the brand leader and it was the main reason Whitbread bought the brewery.

This beer is one of the many reasons I thank the heavens for the Whitbread Gravity Book. Because without it I’d have no idea how much lactose was used. Since it isn’t mentioned in the brewing records. Whitbread brewed it as a normal Stout and only added the lactose as primings at racking time. By comparing the OG as brewed with the OG in the Gravity Book, I could work out how much lactose had been added. As brewed, the OG was 1050

Other than the added lactose, the recipe is the same as Porter and London Stout, with which Mackeson was parti-gyled in various combinations.


1939 Whitbread Mackeson Stout
pale malt 8.25 lb 66.43%
brown malt 1.00 lb 8.05%
chocolate malt 1.00 lb 8.05%
flaked oats 0.09 lb 0.72%
lactose 0.75 lb 6.04%
No. 3 invert sugar 1.00 lb 8.05%
caramel 1000 SRM 0.33 lb 2.66%
Hallertau 75 mins 0.50 oz
Fuggles 75 mins 0.75 oz
Goldings 30 mins 1.50 oz
OG 1057
FG 1021.5
ABV 4.70
Apparent attenuation 62.28%
IBU 32
SRM 43
Mash at 149º F
Sparge at 170º F
Boil time 75 minutes
pitching temp 62º F
Yeast Wyeast 1099 Whitbread Ale

5 comments:

  1. So could the "Guinness is good for you" campaign have been a reaction to the growth of this style?

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  2. Sic1314,

    the idea of Stout being nourishing and healthy goes back to the 19th century.

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  3. The pub I first frequented as a teenager sold bottles of it, but it was seen as something that only older women drank so I stuck to the keg Whitbread Trophy bitter on draught. Wish I had tried it now. Can you still buy bottles of it?

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  4. The whole "stout is healthy" meme is fascinating: some of the adverts for Deutscher Porter in the 19th century are unbelievable!

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  5. Ron: Do you have some nice picture of a paper add about that? It would be nice with a source

    ReplyDelete